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We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

View contacts
Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Press
FacilitiesManagementsRoleinBusinessStrategy

Facilities Management's Role in Business Strategy

Executives don't always perceive facilities management to be an important or necessary element of their overall business strategy, and it's fair to say some facilities teams also share that perception. This can be a costly mistake, because every aspect of an organization's performance is affected by the conditions its buildings and workspaces.

By Aleya Harris


For some industries, a business's facilities may have more influence on its financial health than is obvious. In order to gauge that impact, you must fully understand both the operational goals and priorities of the business; and the fundamental requirements of its employees and workspaces.

How Facilities Management and Business Strategy Are Intertwined


Detailed knowledge of facilities and their internal systems is becoming a specialized area of concern for more organizations. Facilities managers are uniquely positioned to inform planning and decision-making at the highest levels.


Facilities managers are entrusted to take responsibility for what is, for most companies, their most important and valuable single asset. However, many executives regard facilities as non-working assets, sunk costs that don't play a role in their performance, or sales goals—regardless of whether that's accurate.

How to Create Strategic Synergy


Facilities managers need to be able to effectively contribute their specialized knowledge and perspective to the overall business strategy planning. To do this, it is incumbent on them to educate themselves in several areas that fall outside the general remit of facilities management, such as:


  • The company’s overall business operating environment.

  • Goals and attitudes of top management.

  • Market positioning and objectives.

  • The perspectives of customers, shareholders, competitors, and other stakeholders.


All of these factors must be taken into account when formulating strategies at the executive level.


When businesses require costly investments in software, equipment, or other resources in order to perform their basic operations, developing long-term plans is crucial. Long-term plans define when to upgrade, replace, or defer maintenance on these key assets. The facility manager’s institutional knowledge can aid in optimizing these plans, and making decisions that will benefit the company in the long run.


Facilities managers can also have important insights into how building design and integrated systems affect the experiences of employees and customers.

Conclusion


Bringing your knowledge and experience to the table as a facility manager can often mean taking on extra efforts to educate yourself about the big-picture aspects of the business. By doing so, you can become an invaluable contributor to strategic planning that will keep your company growing and thriving.