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We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

View contacts
Global contacts

We operate in more than 50 countries around the world. If your country is not on the list, please refer to our global contacts.

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Press
02-25-19-Using-Lighting-to-Improve-Employee-Health-and-Productivity

Using Lighting to Improve Employee Health and Productivity

One-size-fits-all lighting solutions usually succeed at making sure nobody in your building is really happy with the lighting.

By Aleya Harris


For too many workers, the word “office” brings up associations with harsh overhead lights. And for too many business owners, lighting in a workplace is not considered unless the darkness is literally affecting their employee’s ability to see. But for expert facilities managers, there isn’t the option of ignoring lighting, or treating it like an afterthought. You’re involved in every choice of lighting—what type to install, what bulbs to use, when and how brightly to keep them on—and understand that lighting can have a profound effect on every person working in your facility.


Lighting influences our circadian rhythms — the “internal clocks” that tell us when it’s time to sleep and when it’s time to get up and get productive. It influences our moods as well, and light-based therapies have been shown to be effective at reducing depression. Optimal lighting will help keep workers alert, focused, and active.

Natural Is Better


Many studies have indicated that natural daylight is the most beneficial type of light. Daylight helps keep circadian rhythms regulated. This helps people get more, higher quality rest; and keeps them feeling more energetic during their active hours.


When it’s possible to design a building or organize a workspace so that workers are able to receive natural sunlight through windows or glass walls, the improvement in performance is often significant. Other undeniable benefits of daylight are that it’s free, sustainable, and environmentally-friendly.

Let There Be Individual Lighting


One-size-fits-all lighting solutions usually succeed at making sure nobody in your building is really happy with the lighting. While everyone benefits from sufficient lighting, what’s uncomfortably bright for one person can be too dim for another. Furthermore, not every task demands the same type of lighting. For example, a small room for quiet study or discussion demands different lighting than a large, shared project workspace.


Any type of individual environmental controls typically lead to better morale and improved productivity. For many people, lighting is one of the most important aspects of creating an environment in which they feel comfortable and empowered. One way to achieve this is to allow employees to adjust the light to their own comfort level by giving each workstation individual lighting controls.

Gather Data to Find Your Lighting Solution


When making or proposing changes to facility lighting, data is your best friend. Surveying employees about their lighting preferences and monitoring their productivity can help you determine the best lighting solutions for every facet of your enterprise. Don’t just let there be light — let there be the right light for your business.